Mother of Invention

Author: Caeli Wolfson Widger

Published: May 22, 2018

Publisher: Little A

Where I picked up my book: Received free via publisher and Net Galley

Key Words: Motherhood, Science Fiction, Pregnancy

My Rating: 4.5 stars

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Synopsis (via Goodreads):

What will a mother sacrifice to have it all?

Meet Silicon Valley executive Tessa Callahan, a woman passionate about the power of technology to transform women’s lives. Her company’s latest invention, the Seahorse Solution, includes a breakthrough procedure that safely accelerates human pregnancy from nine months to nine weeks, along with other major upgrades to a woman’s experience of early maternity.

The inaugural human trial of Seahorse will change the future of motherhood—and it’s Tessa’s job to monitor the first volunteer mothers-to-be. She’ll be their advocate and confidante. She’ll allay their doubts and soothe their anxieties. But when Tessa discovers disturbing truths behind the transformative technology she’s championed, her own fear begins to rock her faith in the Seahorse Solution. With each new secret Tessa uncovers, she realizes that the endgame is too inconceivable to imagine.

Caeli Wolfson Widger’s bold and timely novel examines the fraught sacrifices that women make to succeed in both career and family against a backdrop of technological innovation. It’s a story of friendship, risk, betrayal, and redemption—and an unnerving interrogation of a future in which women can engineer their lives as never before.

My Thoughts:

I LOVED this book. So much, that I found my mind wandering during the workday, while walking around the city, and while trying (and failing) to fall asleep. It was one of those books that I just became so engrossed in and couldn’t let it go until the end. And even now that I’ve finished it, I just keep going back and thinking what if…

And if I’m being very honest, I just keep looking at pregnant people and going down a slightly insane rabbit hole lol. But that’s neither here nor there 😉

One thing that I’ve been thinking about a lot after finishing up this book are the roles women have in society. At times, it seems like a woman is expected to either be successful in their careers and climb that career ladder, or successful at parenting and motherhood, taking care of household duties, making meals, but rarely do we see plots, or real-life scenarios for that matter, where both of these things happen smoothly. I’ve hit an age where this is a constant thought for myself, and a lot of my friends. How can we hold careers, run a household, make a baby, raise children and do it all successfully? And why are there unspoken expectations that we (women) must take on these roles? Do we need to choose between career and family, or can we have both? Are societal expectations making us feel like we have to choose? Is it the patriarchy that is forcing us to choose? Is it our own self-inflicted guilt that is making us to feel this way? Honestly, this is an excellent story, but it’s also a great starting off point for a discussion about expectations versus reality in terms of motherhood, careers and life. Tessa is a really complex character, as are many of the other women in the book, and they epitomize the realities of real life women in general, but with a Sci-Fi twist.

This is a face paced, thought provoking book that takes you through the complexities of motherhood, the throes of Silicon Valley, government cover-ups (don’t even get me started on this because I’ve definitely had plenty of these thoughts and questions about our government) and what it is like to be a woman in society. Mother of Invention is an imaginative read, yet set in some solid reality that I highly recommend!

Thank you Little A for the free review copy.

bookishfolk…read instead.

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